Kimberley Crevice-skink

© Chris Malam/AWC

Quick Facts

  • OFFICIAL NAME: Egernia douglasi
  • FAMILY: Scincidae
  • NATIONAL CONSERVATION STATUS: Not listed
  • STATE CONSERVATION STATUS: Not listed in WA
  • SURVIVING POPULATION: Unknown
What Is Awc Doing James Smith Kimberley Crevice Skink © James Smith/AWC

What is AWC doing?

AWC ecologists in the Kimberley carried out the first ecological research into the Kimberley Crevice-skink (Egernia douglasi). The skinks had been recorded from just a handful of sites prior to AWC’s work, with just a single sighting made in the past 30 years. Since 2012, AWC has discovered new populations of the skinks at Charnley River-Artesian Range, Mornington, and Yampi. Most were found by deploying camera traps along the edge of rocky ranges. 

Rl 21st © Rod Beament/AWC

Threats to Species

Further fieldwork being undertaken will investigate why the Kimberley Crevice-skink has such a restricted range, and whether poor fire regimes constitute a threat to the species. 

Data Deficient

Being one of Australia’s most elusive lizards, very little is known about the habitat preferences and behaviour of the Kimberley Crevice-skink. Preliminary work suggests that fruit forms part of their diet, and they appear to be active only during the warmer months of the wet season (September – April). The skinks were recorded moving over short distances, and likely have a relatively small home range.

Sanctuaries Where You Can Find the Kimberley Crevice-skink

© Wayne Lawler/AWC
Western Australia

Charnley River – Artesian Range

Charnley River-Artesian Range has a vital role to play in protecting and restoring the endangered wildlife of northern Australia.

© Nick Rains
Western Australia

Mornington – Marion Downs

Mornington – Marion Downs is a model for conservation in northern Australia, protecting nearly 6,000 square kilometres of the iconic...

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